Home Care

With advances in technology, aging population and epidemics of chronic diseases, more and more health care is moving towards home care. According to the AARP, 82% of people prefer to stay in their homes as long as possible. Today many services that are available in the hospital can be provided at home. Research has shown that when people are discharged from hospital, the majority of patients prefer to be discharged back to their own homes, rather than being discharged to a facility.

For everyone, from children to seniors, the thought of leaving the familiarity of home can be a scary and intimidating experience. Relocating to new surroundings can prove to be a huge lifestyle shift for anyone at any age. Whether it’s after treatment, post-op, or even elder care – as we age home is the place to be. Here is a nice article on the benefits of home care.


Statistics

1) Growing Aging Population:
Today, over 7000 people are turning 65 and within 10 years, there will be over 54 million people over the age of 65. That’s almost 16% of the U.S. population. In fact, the number of Americans over 65 is expected to more than double to 89 million by 2050, according to the Census Bureau.

People over 85 represent the fastest growing population segment – and the wealthiest. This segment of the market tend to have greater than average healthcare needs and are growing faster than the total population, increasing the demand for home health services and all types of senior home care

2) Caregiving :
More than 65 million people, 29% of the U.S. population, provide care for a chronically ill, disabled or aged family member or friend during any given year and spend an average of 20 hours per week providing care for their loved one.
– Caregiving in the United States: National Alliance for Caregiving in collaboration with AARP

Types of Home Care Services

Medical Home Care: includes highly skilled services, like high-tech nursing for those in need of specialized neurological care, blood sugar testing, home infusion therapy, hospice assistance, a wide range of services for people with disabilities and/or special needs, pediatric nursing as well as physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy.

Non-Medical Home Care: includes personal care services like bath visits, grooming and companion services like assistance with connecting clients with loved ones through emails and social media, creating customized grocery lists in accordance with dietary needs and preferences, engaging in activities such as art projects and reading, facilitating visits with friends and neighbors, planning visits, outings and trips.

Here are a few related definitions by Wikipedia

Activities of daily living(ADL) refers to six activities: (bathing, dressing, transferring, using the toilet, eating, and walking) that reflect the patient’s capacity for self-care.

Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) refers to six daily tasks: (light housework, preparing meals, taking medications, shopping for groceries or clothes, using the telephone, and managing money) that enables the patient to live independently in the community.


National Senior Home Care/Caregiving Resources

Administration on Aging (AOA): AoA envisions ensuring the continuation of a vibrant aging services network at State, Territory, local and Tribal levels through funding of lower-cost, non-medical services and supports that provide the means by which many more seniors can maintain their independence.

Eldercare Locator: The Eldercare Locator, a public service of the Administration on Aging, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is a nationwide service that connects older Americans and their caregivers with information on senior services.

National Association for Home Care and Hospice : The National Association for Home Care & Hospice is the nation’s largest trade association representing the interests and concerns of home care agencies, hospices, and home care aide organizations.

National Family Caregivers Association : The National Family Caregivers Association educates, supports, empowers and speaks up for the more than 65 million Americans who care for loved ones with a chronic illness or disability or the frailties of old age.

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